[vcf-midatlantic] WTB: DECbrouter

Kenneth Seefried kjseefried at gmail.com
Wed Jun 28 15:05:58 EDT 2017


From: Dave McGuire <mcguire at neurotica.com>
>
>   If you need to route something like a T1 or T3 line, that's pretty
> tough to do on anything but a purpose-built router due to support for
> those types of hardware interfaces.
>

That's not really true, except for very exotic or very ancient
interfaces.  I have at various times had DDS/ISDN, T-1/CT-1, T-3/DS-3,
HSSI as well as Ethernet, TR, FDDI and ATM up to OC12 running on x86
platforms under various open source OSes (usually FreeBSD or OpenBSD)
in production.

Admittedly, FDDI, TR & ATM support have aged poorly in OSS, I haven't
tried HSSI in years, and not too many people are provisioning DS-3s or
OC-12 these days given the alternatives.

What you don't get on the open source platform relative to a Cisco,
et. al., is the protocol support.  Pretty much only IP and limited
higher level serial protocols (SDLC/HDLC/PPP/SLIP).

>
> Further, for more modern circuits
> like OC192s, etc, there really aren't too many general-purpose computers
> available that can move data that fast in any predictable or consistent
> way,
>

While I'm unaware of an OC192 card for, say, PCI-e, FreeBSD on modern
systems using Intel or Chelsio PCI-e ethernet cards can reliably route
between 10G ports at wirespeed.  I haven't gotten any of the Chelsio
40G cards yet, but they're supported as well.  There are lots of folks
doing exactly this to avoid the cost of something like a Cisco 12000
series router.  Not just in labs or moms basement; for example the
NANOG mailing list regularly has folks talking about this sort of
setup running with BGP as core infrastructure.  Folks like ServU have
built a business around Intel ecosystem + BSD + 1/10/40G routers.

What you definitely don't get on OSS is more than rudimentary QoS.
Sophisticated bandwidth management pretty much requires dedicated
ASICs.

>
> and nothing anywhere near as reliable or internally redundant as
> something like a big Cisco or Juniper machine.  They exist with their
> six-figure price tags for a reason.
>

I would agree with this.

From: systems_glitch <systems.glitch at gmail.com>
>
> V.35 sync serial. You can *get* V.35 cards for PCs, but I'd imagine it's
> not supported in most OSes I'd want to do routing in (namely, OpenBSD).
>

You'd be surprised.  The Lan Media Corp sync serial cards are pretty
well supported on OpenBSD.  The Sangoma sync cards might be; the T-1
cards are.

KJ



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