[vcf-midatlantic] B&C Microsystems EEPROM software

Matt Reynolds mattreynolds04 at gmail.com
Tue May 28 09:55:26 EDT 2019


That would be awesome.  I'll try it and report back.

On Mon, May 27, 2019, 10:24 PM J. Alexander Jacocks <jjacocks at gmail.com>
wrote:

> Matt,
>
> If it’s rs-232 serial, likely you don’t need anything but a term program.
> Try 9600bps, 8 data bits, no parity, and 1 stop bit, to start with.
>  38,400bps is also common.
>
> A large number of programmers from that era are self-contained; since
> rs-232 isn’t a real-time-suitable protocol (like usb!), images were
> generally uploaded to the unit’s internal memory, before programming a
> device.  Similarly, devices could be read to memory, and then downloaded.
>
> - Alex
>
> On Mon, May 27, 2019 at 16:27 Matt Reynolds via vcf-midatlantic <
> vcf-midatlantic at lists.vcfed.org> wrote:
>
>> Herb,
>>
>> It's vintage, which is why I thought I'd take a stab at asking you folks.
>> The motherboard says it was made in 1989.
>>
>> 1.  It is screen printed in the name on the device that it is rs-232.
>>
>> 2.  I can try and use PuTTY and see if that works but I'm sure it needs
>> more than that.
>>
>> 3.  I'm trying to set this device up so i can read\burn EEPROMS, so I'd
>> have to buy\use something else to read the one inside of it..  There is an
>> 8085 processor in it.  There is also an 8155 and 8251.
>>
>> 4.  This may have been common in the past, but I'm only four years older
>> than the device itself.  I've never had to do it, I'm trying to learn
>> about
>> it, which is why I bought it in the first place :)
>>
>> I am not giving up hope that the software is out there somewhere.  The
>> software for it's more expensive relative is on bitsavers, I will probably
>> try and install it and see what it does regardless.  Maybe I'll get lucky
>> and it will work.  I'll also try the straight up serial connection and see
>> what happens.
>>
>> Thanks,
>>
>> Matt
>>
>>
>> On Mon, May 27, 2019, 3:34 PM Herb Johnson via vcf-midatlantic <
>> vcf-midatlantic at lists.vcfed.org> wrote:
>>
>> > >  software
>> > > that goes with a B&C Microsystems Inc. UP100 Universal RS232
>> > E(E)PROM/Micro
>> > > Programmer.
>> >
>> > If this is some modern unit with a single-chip microcontroller, you are
>> > probably out of luck. If not, if it's vintage enough to have a
>> > microprocessor and some ROM and some RAM:
>> >
>> > 1) confirm the unit is "RS-232" or serial. Many of them used a PC
>> > parallel port. YOu'll have to reverse engineer the circuits at the DB25
>> > (or DB9) connector.
>> >
>> > 2) If it's really serial, chances are it can be operated with a serial
>> > terminal (or PC running a comm program). You may have to guess at the
>> > baud rates, it may be autobaud, using the first character received to
>> > determine a baud rate. "Hit return a lot.".
>> >
>> > If it's PC parallel, you are mostly out of luck. But there's still:
>> >
>> > 3) if all that fails, Pull the PROM out of the unit - chances are it has
>> > one - and dump it. Of course you'll need an EPROM reader, once, to do
>> > this. Also note the processor in the unit. You may need to disassemble
>> > the code, at least a little. But it may be informative even as an ASCII
>> > dump.
>> >
>> > - Um, this is the kind of thing done, lots of time in the past, to make
>> > sense of some unknown microcomputer. Is this "lost art" now?
>> >
>> > Puzzled,
>> > Herb Johnson
>> >
>> > --
>> > Herbert R. Johnson, New Jersey in the USA
>> > http://www.retrotechnology.com OR .net
>> >
>>
>


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